“Monsanto (Bayer) loses a huge crop damage lawsuit that could lead to billions in payouts” Episode 21

Listen to the Podcast:

In this week's episode...

Have you heard of the term Dicamba? Monsanto created genetically engineered crops that were resistant to this other herbicide, not just Roundup but also Dicamba. They were warned up and down by experts that that would get them in trouble. On February 15th, 2020, a jury awarded a peach farmer, $265 million in a lawsuit against Monsanto and their partner BASF for introducing Dicamba resistant seeds. In this podcast Jeffrey describes how this is extremely significant and that it, combined with other evidence that we now have, could be the payback to Monsanto that we've been looking for.

Notes for this week's Podcast

Key Takeaways:

(24:13)
So again, I want to ask you if you can send me, I’m raising money now at the Institute for Responsible Technology. If you could send me to Germany, I'll be there on April 28th, 2020 to speak at the shareholders meetings. I have a very big ask for Monsanto Bayer. I'm not going to say what it is now. I'm preparing it and I'll wait. You'll hear about it in April, but I would love it if I can get your support to get there because I come, I, it's interesting. Uh, in fact, in 2016 I published a letter to the shareholders of Bayer saying that there were many undisclosed risks to buying Monsanto, and I urged them not to. And one of the eight risks was the, was the damage by Roundup to human health, and I highlighted the world health organization's declaration that glyphosate was a probable human carcinogen and that has already cost them dearly and possibly it will cost them up to $12 billion in settlements.

(04:07)
Now to put this in perspective, the current amount that the whole Bayer corporation is worth according to stock is about $72 billion. They're battering around a number for a settlement for the Monsanto cancer non Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer trials with between 50 and a hundred thousand plaintiffs. They're talking about a settlement that might be as much as 12 billion. So you've take 72 billion you minus 12 billion, you get 60 billion. Now if there are 2,000 farmers who are suing over damage to their crops, let's just say they get 10% of what Bayer farms got for their peach trees, which is probably high, but let's just pretend. That's 53 billion. That would be almost the entire whatever's left in the company.

(07:14)
Monsanto basically brought GMOs into the marketplace because glyphosate, the chief poison in Roundup was going off patent in the year 2000 and so they created Roundup ready seeds, which your farmers purchased. They had to sign an agreement that they would only use Monsanto's version of glyphosate based herbicides once the patent expired and not the Chinese imports, etc. But only Monsanto or its licensees. So it became a very popular system. You buy the rounded pretty soy corn, cotton, canola, sugar beets or alfalfa, and then you buy Monsanto's Roundup and you spray right over the top of the fields and you kill all of the other weeds, but not the genetically engineered crops engineered, engineered not to die. Many of you know this, but you also probably know that the weeds started to outsmart Monsanto. Pigweeds for example, huge ag, like the super weeds in cotton and in soy, particularly in the South, they can grow 10 feet tall.

(09:49)
Now, DuPont, which is now combined with um, Dow and they're now Corteva. They developed a Dicamba herbicide also. Well, they can also face multiple farmer lawsuits, but so far, not yet. Now here's what happened. This is really interesting. It gives you the mindset of Monsanto. That's absolutely typical Monsanto, they started to sell their Dicamba tolerant GMO seeds in 2016, a year before the EPA had approved their supposedly less volatile spray of Dicamba, but the, being Monsanto and BASF did not allow independent testing of this herbicide. They just said it would be less volatile. And it turns out it's not particularly great, but why would they sell the crops that can be sprayed with Dicamba where their supposedly less volatile Herbicide was not available? It was begging the farmers to use Dicamba in their pesticide tag mixtures, not the the vapor grip one, but the normal one that'll just fly in the air, move over to nearby farms and destroy or damage the crops

This week's Transcript

Introduction:

Hi everyone, this is Jeffrey Smith and welcome to my podcast Live Healthy Be Well. Have you heard of the term Dicamba? Well, I didn't until Monsanto created genetically engineered crops that were resistant to this other herbicide, not just Roundup but also Dicamba. They were warned up and down by experts that would get them in trouble and sure enough on February 15th, 2020 a jury awarded a peach farmer, $265 million of Monsanto and their partner BASF‘s money for introducing Dicamba resistant seeds in this live Facebook, which I did earlier this week at the Institute for responsible technology’s Facebook page I describe how this is extremely significant and that it combined with other evidence that we now have could be the karma or the payback of Monsanto that we've been looking for.

Enjoy.

Interview:

Hi everyone, this is Jeffrey Smith, and I've got some really interesting news about the future of Monsanto, which of course was purchased by Bayer, the aspirin company and they are not happy.

The shareholders revolted last year where they, where they vote of no confidence and it didn't change anything. But this past week, the chairman of Bayer announced he was going to step down during the shareholders meeting on April 28th, more about that I might go with your help, we'll talk about that in a second. But there is a huge, there is huge news that just appeared as a blip in the news. So I'm going to give you this context.

There is a peach farmer who has a very significant, uh, peach orchard, uh, and he sued Bayer for dam and also BASF because they're working together on this new GMO and herbicide combination, uh, and declared that their herbicide damaged so much of their, of his crops if more than he lost more than 30,000 peach trees. And it normally the 5,000 acre family farm produces, um, five to 6 million pounds of peaches, uh, along with various other things.

But this, the Dicamba herbicide left the soybean or cotton fields where it was planted, moved over and landed on his property and he was struggling to stay in business. He claimed that he had lost about $20 million. The jury agreed that it was in fact the fault of Monsanto and BASF and they ordered them to pay. Now check out these numbers, $15 million in compensatory damages, meaning to compensate for the farmer's loss and $250 million in punitive damages. Now punitive means that they want to actually hurt the company because they are aware that the company did things that specifically whereas malicious and reckless and damaging. Now this is actually really interesting because this is just one lawsuit. There's now one, over 2000 farmers who are expected to file lawsuits. There's already a hundred farmers in one, in one action. There's lawsuits being made on behalf of farmers in Mississippi, Kansas, Nebraska, Illinois, and many other key farming States.

Now to put this in perspective, the current amount that the whole Bayer corporation is worth according to stock is about $72 billion. They're battering around a number for a settlement for the Monsanto cancer non Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer trials with between 50 and a hundred thousand plaintiffs. They're talking about a settlement that might be as much as 12 billion. So you've take 72 billion you minus 12 billion, you get 60 billion. Now if there are 2,000 farmers who are suing over damage to their crops, let's just say they get 10% of what Bayer farms got for their peach trees, which is probably high, but let's just pretend. That's 53 billion. That would be almost the entire whatever's left in the company. It won't get that high, but to put it in perspective, I just read today, new study linking Roundup with leukemia. Now leukemia has about five times the number of people in the United States that have non Hodgkin's lymphoma.

If the non Hodgkin's lymphoma lawsuit resulted in a $12 billion settlement, what happens if leukemia goes to trial? Do we multiply that 12 by five is it $60 billion? I remember Bayer iis only worth about 72 billion. It used to be worth about a $100 billion. But when Monsanto lost the first trial, it dropped by 30%, 20% and 30% and 35% and 40% and been hovering because they're aware that the noose around their neck from these lawsuits is huge. So we're talking about the possibility when you add the farmer lawsuits with potentially several different health related lawsuits leukemia is only one of them, a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as another, uh, infertility could be another. There's a lot of them that they're very closely associated with Roundup and it's active, it's chief poisoned glyphosate. We're talking about the possibility of an ultimate bankruptcy through the courts where Bayer, that purchased Monsanto, Is going to have to pay back some of the damage that it's caused some because it's not going to be able to pay back all of it because they just don't have that much money.

All right. So first of all, I want to present this kind of information to the shareholders meeting in, in Germany on April 28th I've been invited to speak at a slot to the shareholders and, and if you'd like to help send me, go to https://responsibletechnology.org/ and go to the donations tab and make a donation. And we will like to use that towards getting me to Germany. And I will also be doing some press events if we get there. But let me give you the background about Dicamba because this is important. This is interesting you if you, unless you've been following it. This is a new term you've probably never heard of. Dicamba uh, I didn't know much about it until it entered my world. And here's how it did.

Monsanto basically brought GMOs into the marketplace because glyphosate, the chief poison in Roundup was going off patent in the year 2000 and so they created Roundup ready seeds, which your farmers purchased. They had to sign an agreement that they would only use Monsanto's version of glyphosate based herbicides once the patent expired and not the Chinese imports, etc. But only Monsanto or its licensees. So it became a very popular system. You buy the rounded pretty soy corn, cotton, canola, sugar beets or alfalfa, and then you buy Monsanto's Roundup and you spray right over the top of the fields and you kill all of the other weeds, but not the genetically engineered crops engineered, engineered not to die. Many of you know this, but you also probably know that the weeds started to outsmart Monsanto.
Pigweeds for example, huge ag, like the super weeds in cotton and in soy, particularly in the South, they can grow 10 feet tall. Their stocks can be the size of baseball bats. They can have 400,000 seeds in a single plant and their stalks when cut, they can puncture tractor tires. So this was, they are, they were selling out of hoes and machetes because they were equipping farm workers in the South to handle this pigweed by hand because Roundup wasn't working anymore. Roundup resistant pigweed and other weeds, and other weeds had had popped up on half of the acreage in the United States, half the 300 million acres around the world. So what was the biotech response? Well, let's create another chemical trap for farmers. Let's combine Dicamba resistant seeds with mixtures of Dicamba herbicide and Roundup so that the pigweed and other other, um, weeds would die because if the Roundup didn't kill it, the Dicamba would. And so they have Dicamba tolerant cotton and um, soy.

Now, Dicamba was used by farmers since the 1960s, but they wouldn't spray it in the warm months because they knew it would volatilize, which means it would come off of the ground and then float away and then land and damage other crops.

It was also spot sprayed, not sprayed over large swaths of land, but Monsanto and BASF, another chemical company announced in 2011 that they were getting together to create new herbicides. And Monsanto had herbicide tolerant seeds. And so they claimed that the new herbicides they were creating would not float away and then damage other crops. They named it vapor grip technology and other things so that it would be less volatile, less prone to drift. So BASF created something called Eugenia and Monsanto XtendiMax.

Now, DuPont, which is now combined with um, Dow and they're now Corteva. They developed a Dicamba herbicide also. Well, they can also face multiple farmer lawsuits, but so far, not yet. Now here's what happened. This is really interesting. It gives you the mindset of Monsanto. That's absolutely typical Monsanto, they started to sell their Dicamba tolerant GMO seeds in 2016 a year before the EPA had approved their supposedly less volatile spray of Dicamba, but they being Monsanto and BASF did not allow independent testing of this herbicide. They just said it would be less volatile. And it turns out it's not particularly great, but why would they sell the crops that can be sprayed with Dicamba where their supposedly less volatile Herbicide was not available? It was begging the farmers to use Dicamba in their pesticide tag mixtures, not the the vapor grip one, but the normal one that'll just fly in the air, move over to nearby farms and destroy or damage the crops.

Now before 2015 farmers never filed more than 40 claims about the Dicamba drifting, in all of the five years proceeding. But Monsanto, according to documents made public from the lawsuit, Monsanto was projecting that there'd be thousands of complaints, thousands of filed complaints of crop damage each year following the introduction of their crop system method.

So they actually predicted it and it turned out to be accurate. Uh, they, they estimated thousands of complaints. Uh, they estimated there was 1,305 complaints in 2016, 20 a Monsanto projected 2,765 complaints in 2017 the company actually received over 3,000, over 3,100 and there was a record high in 2018. And there's a lot of people that got damaged that never filed complaints. So they were aware, and the trials brought this out. They knew there was going to be crop damage. The EPA knew it in 2017 they acknowledged over 2,700 official crop injury investigations and estimated that 3.6 million acres of soybeans were impacted. That's 4% of all the soybeans and there was also problems with tomatoes, watermelon, cantaloupe, vineyards, pumpkin's vegetables, tobacco, residential gardens, trees and shrubs. So there was a disaster on millions of acres.

Now what was interesting was that Monsanto was pushing ahead with, now Bayer, with selling more and more. Originally when they introduced their combination of the herbs, herbicide, and the seeds, 20 million acres are planted in 2017 of soybeans. That's 22% of the soybean acreage. The next year it went to two 49% or 40 million and then the next year, last year it was at 50 million acres, or about about two thirds of, of US soybean acreage, and then it sort of leveled off. And there were efforts in all these States to stop it. Missouri issued a stop sale, but then rescinded it. Arkansas tried to stop it, but they were sued by Monsanto. So all the different states were freaking out because the farmers were freaking out and the records showed that this was all expected. In fact, in one BASF document referred to Dicamba damage complaints as the “ticking time bomb that has finally exploded”. And they were telling farmers that there'd be no yield impacts, but they were telling privately the pesticide applicators that there would be. So why were they willing to risk all of these complaints knowing that they were going to be faced with thousands of complaints by farmers who got damaged.

Here's the interesting thing, because you're planting soybeans or cotton and you know that your farmer is, that's next to you, your neighbor, is planting a Dicamba resistant soil or cotton. Then you will want to grow, you'll be forced to use the Dicamba resistant seeds. Otherwise you may face massive damage when the herbicide volatilizes, moves over and lands on yours. This is what the jury concluded that they, Monsanto and BASF conspired inactions that they knew would lead to widespread crop damage because they expected it would increase their profits. And you can, the Reuters and others that talk to the farmers, and it's exactly what happened. The farmer would talk, call another farmers that I had got to go Dicamba this year. And so that means that the,that the neighbor had to also.

Now, Monsanto had already been through this because they sued hundreds of farmers who allegedly illegally planted mines or replanted Monsanto's Roundup ready soybeans because you're not allowed to replant them.

Um, what happened was they would go in, they would steal samples, trespass on farmers land, they'd steal samples, they test them and say, aha, you planted are Roundup ready soybeans or canola or corn or whatever, without our permission, you owe us millions of dollars, give us millions of dollars and we may not sue you. This happened to Percy SJ Meiser, he never bought Monsanto seeds. He had the, he had contamination and Saskatchewan from neighborhood canola, neighbors canola seeds, from passing trucks. And Monsanto went in there and collected seeds and found that they were genetically engineered because they were contaminated and he got sued. So what happened? All of these farmers all over North America realized they didn't want to be sued by Monsanto, so they were forced, they were forced to plant the Roundup ready seeds so that Monsanto wouldn't sue them. So this is a way that they're forcing out of fear farmers to grow their Dicamba resistant seeds, because the neighbors spraying could destroy or damage and possibly bankrupt the farmers in the area.

Now the company Bayer is saying, “Oh, it was because the farmers weren't doing it right and now that we've trained a lot of farmers, there's been a reduction in, in the complaints”. The reason why there is a reduction in damage is because now two thirds of all the soybean planters in the, in the country have Dicamba resistance and so they've actually, there's less damage because there's more Dicamba resistant soy and cotton. And the Dicamba is also damaging the honeybee production. That in one case, it's, it appears to have dropped the amount of honey produced by 50%. The research shows that it can reduce by half the number of flowers that plants produce and the number of visits by pollinators. Now what's happening is that because of this disaster by the Dicamba resistant, um, herbicides, there's a Corteva, which is a combination of DuPont and Dow.

They're putting together and we're about to sell, uh, herb, um, seeds that are resistant to glufosinate, which is also a, um, it's called Liberty or glufosinate. It's another very dangerous herbicide and 2,4-D another dangerous herbicide, which was part of agent orange and glyphosate. So this is called enlist. And so they're going to expect to capture 20% of the soybean market this year because of the people are concerned about Dicamba. So they're going to switch over to this other version of a GMO. By Corteva. They will be sprayed with 2,4-D with glyphosate, with glufosinate combinations. 2,4-D is often packed with um, dioxin because of contaminants in their production. Glufosinate is linked to birth defects, glyphosate, we've talked about for years as linked to all these particular diseases. And Monsanto is gonna come out with a new version of their Xtend soybeans called XtendFlex, which are resistant not only to glyphosate and Dicamba, but to glufosinate as well, which is that thing that's linked to birth defects and absolute disaster.

So now they want to create, as they said, subsequent generations of GMOs will be resistant to six herbicides. So they'll have cocktails of six different types of herbicides that they can spray. And what herbicides are combined, their impact on human health and the environment can multiply many fold,. But they're never tested in combination, that's one of the many drawbacks in many loopholes of the regulatory system. There's also new sprays on the marketplace that are, uh, are looking to be introduced that use RNA, RNA, which is designed to interfere with DNA expression. So you spray it on a crop and it'll kill certain weeds or it'll kill certain insects. But what if it gets on our skin and gets through our skin, It might change our genetic expression as well.

Now, none of these, none of these articles talk about the bigger solution. We know that weeds are produced often because of soil depletion. And if you build the, the biology of the soil, then you reduce the capacity for that soil to carry the weeds for a healthy, diverse system. You don't need the herbicides. I remember visiting Vonda Sheeva's farm and Dera dune where she said you don't, they didn't need herbicides, they didn't need insecticides because the diversity and the health of the soil prevented that as an issue. So agro ecology and regenerative agriculture together can produce the system that doesn't require these extensive chemical inputs. Which not only destroy the environment, but also human health. You may ask, does Dicamba, is Dicamba a problem for human health? Well, we don't know a ton about it, but there are evidence, there are studies that show links to cancer and hyper -thyroid, hypothyroidism. So there's several studies I have in front of me, but I don't need to go into them. But you get the idea that we're talking about a chemical treadmill, which is designed to sell more chemicals. It's designed to sell more chemicals.

So it's interesting that you know, as, as I'm looking at doing this through, um, Facebook live, I see Janet, you're saying about karma is the darnedest thing. Yeah, absolutely. The karma of, of the bout of Monsanto causing such damage, they may end up bankrupt just to pay back a percentage of the damage that they created. And as Karen said, mother nature is taking back control. You know, it's true. It, the herbicides are becoming, um, useless. Uh, and that was something that was predicted. People predicted the problem with Dicamba, and they ignored that too. Nature seems to be working on our behalf.

Well that's the news about Dicamba and the issue here is this. We saw the, the trial about non Hodgkin's lymphoma, huge victories, huge punitive damages, punitive damages dwarfed the compensatory damages. Iin one trial, the third non Hodgkin's lymphoma trial with two plaintiffs, a couple, the punitive damages were $2 billion. It was lowered by the judge significantly after that. But it demonstrates that the jury saw, saw the innards, the thinking of the company and was disgusted, absolutely disgusted.

I saw that in the cancer trials when the ridiculous ways that Monsanto rigged the research, hid the evidence, ghost wrote studies that had exactly the opposite conclusion as the science and ignored the suffering of people that had tried to contact them and ask for help. They have demonstrated and now that we're getting the actual memos, we're realizing that what I and others have talked about in terms of Monsanto's actions has proven true and we see it in black and white The hundreds, thousands and in some cases millions of documents that have been made public from lawsuits show that they are as bad as we thought they are. They are seeing the damage that they're creating to human health, to farmers lives to the environment and they're ignoring it in order to dominate in sales.And now it's time for them to pay.

So again, I want to ask you if you can send me, I’m raising money now at the Institute for Responsible Technology. If you could send me to Germany, I'll be there on April 28th, 2020 to speak at the shareholders meetings. I have a very big ask for Monsanto Bayer. I'm not going to say what it is now. I'm preparing it and I'll wait. You'll hear about it in April, but I would love it if I can get your support to get there,

it's interesting. Uh, in fact, in 2016 I published a letter to the shareholders of Bayer saying that there were many undisclosed risks to buying Monsanto, and I urged them not to. And one of the eight risks was the, was the damage by Roundup to human health, and I highlighted the World Health Organization's declaration that glyphosate was a probable human carcinogen and that has already cost them dearly and possibly it will cost them up to $12 billion in settlements.

But that's just one within that category, there are seven other categories of very serious damages that could still come. And it's all there, 17 pages of documentation. You can find it in our, on our website by just doing, um, uh, that I warn shareholders about Monsanto. You can find that the documentation, uh, and it's, it's interesting that the shareholders are now erupting and in a revolution against their, the executives who made such a horrible mistake to get in bed with Monsanto, to buy Monsanto and to inherit their raft.

So Rosemary's asking, thanking, me for truth, for fighting for the truth and health. I want to thank all of you for fighting for truth and health, supporting this work and eating safe

Safe Eating Everyone

Thank you for listening to Live Healthy Be Well. Please subscribe to the podcast using whatever app you're listening to the podcast with, or go to livehealthybewell.com to subscribe. This podcast will inform you about health dangers, corporate and government corruption and ways we can protect ourselves, our, and our planning. I interview scientists, experts, authors, whistleblowers, and many people who have not shared their information with the world until now. Please share the podcast with your friends. They enlightened and maeven save lives.

Downloads

Save this episode...

SUBSCRIBE